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New issue of SEALG Newsletter available online

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The latest issue of the SEALG Newsletter has been published recently and can now be downloaded from our group’s homepage at http://www.sealg.org/pdf/newsletter2016.pdf . Please feel free to forward the link to anyone you think may be interested in reading the newsletter.

Contents of the newsletter include:

SEALG Annual Meeting 2016, Copenhagen (report by Doris Jedamski and Holger Warnk)

Early newspapers in Burma (article by San San May)

Vietnamese manuscripts at the British Library (paper presented at the annual meeting by Sud Chonchirdsin)

The mystery of the ‘naughty monks’ in Thai manuscript illustrations of Phra Malai (article byJana Igunma)

Call for Papers: EUROSEAS Conference, Oxford 2017

Older issues of the newsletter can be downloaded freely from our homepage www.sealg.org. Feedback is always welcome by email to myself (jana.igunma AT bl.uk) which I will forward to the contributors of the newsletter.

(Jana Igunma)

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End of Empire – Online initiative by NIAS Press

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An online initiative with the title “End of Empire – 100 days in 1945 that changed Asia and the world” by NIAS press was launched recently to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the end of the Second World War in Asia.

The initiative publishes day by day ‘real-time broadcasts’ of what happened in Asia at the end of World War II. The site combines daily events with commentary, photographs, maps, personal accounts and other material plus links to resources found elsewhere.

Aiming to balance the focus on European events in global public discussions and reminiscences of World War II, the project focuses on a brief, 100-day period at the end of the war across a broad sweep of eastern Asia – a time when the Indonesian and Vietnamese revolutions were born, the fragile wartime truce between Communists and Nationalists in China began to fray, and the first steps were made in Japan towards a new democratic order.

The website is part of a radical, multi-faceted project to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the war’s end and its immediate aftermath. This is done not just via the website but also in printed and electronic publications plus via social media. Nor does the project simply present existing scholarship. It also actively reaches beyond the academic world to encourage non-academics to come forward with primary source material unknown to historians and often limited to their own private circles.

Here, perhaps, is a model for scholarly publishing and learning that both exploits new technologies and retains traditional standards.

One of the great merits of this website is the way it conveys a sense of the fast pace of events in mid-1945 and their interconnectedness across the region at the time.

Those who may find the website difficult to navigate may want to consult the Facebook page for the project.

The outcome of the initiative is due to appear in published form as End of Empire: 100 Days that Changed Asia and the World edited by David Chandler, Robert Cribb and Li Narangoa.

(reported by Gerald Jackson and Inga-Lill Blomkvist)

New issue of SEALG Newsletter online

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The latest issue of the SEALG Newsletter (No. 46, 2014) has been published recently and is available online at http://www.sealg.org/Newsletter2014.pdf or via the SEALG homepage (under ‘Newsletter’).

Included in the newsletter is the report of our group’s annual meeting that took place in June 2014 in Frankfurt, Germany, as well as articles and project reports, some written by SEALG members and others authored by members of the research community. We are very glad to be able to establish and to further enhance the links between librarians and researchers with this new issue of our newsletter.

The contents of the newsletter in detail:

Report of the SEALG Annual Meeting 2014 in Frankfurt

A study of nineteenth century Malay school books in the Malay Peninsula (by Lim Peng Han, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur)

The Museum and Ethnic Struggles (by Gumring Hkangda, Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton & Hove)

Burmese royal barges and boats (by San San May, British Library, London)

The beautiful art of Tai palm leaf manuscripts (by Jana Igunma, British Library, London)

Indonesian manuscripts in the Vatican Library (by Anthony Reid, Australian National University, Canberra)

A preservation project for Cham manuscripts in Vietnam (by Hao Phan, Northern Illinois University Libraries, DeKalb)

Announcement: 2015 Annual Meeting of SEALG and SAALG in Paris

To receive regular information about the publication of new issues of the the SEALG Newsletter, and of news from our group in general, you may either become a member of SEALG via the SEALG homepage or you may subscribe to this blog. Please feel free to forward this information to anyone who may be interested in our work.

Jana Igunma (SEALG committee member)

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Shan Manuscripts in the UK

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An interesting article with the title “An Introduction to the World of Shan Manuscripts” by our member Jotika Khur-Yearn has appeared on the blog of the SOAS Subject Librarians. It gives a short overview of the Shan manuscript tradition and collections of Shan manuscripts in the UK. Jotika is currently working on an exhibition of Shan manuscripts which will be on display at the Wolfson Gallery of the SOAS Library in London in November and December 2014. More details about the upcoming exhibition will follow on this blog nearer the time.

Detail of a cover of a Shan folding book (pap tup) held at the British Library (Or.12040)

Detail of a cover of a Shan folding book (pap tup) held at the British Library (Or.12040)

NIAS Inside – fine scholarship from NIAS Press

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All scholarly books experience a brief moment of freshness at publication. Thereafter they age, some gracefully, while a select few works mature becoming timeless classics in their field. However, far too many studies wither under the pitiless sun of passing time, fading into irrelevance.
Sadly, most books do not become utterly irrelevant, let alone valueless; they are simply forgotten. And yet, time and again, something happens in the world that apparently is new but which is beautifully explained – given context – by one of these old texts.
NIAS books are not immune to ageing, either, but NIAS Press have decided to do something about the obsession with new and the stampede towards obsolescence – hence the launching of a new website with which they aim to link current events (especially in Asia) to Asia research published by NIAS.

Their new blog, NIAS Inside, is a website demonstrating that fine scholarship is timeless and it will be worth watching.

More information and the latest NIAS Press catalogue can be found on the NIAS Press homepage.

(Source: NIAS Press Newsletter May 2014)

 

 

New issue of SEALG Newsletter online

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The latest issue of the SEALG Newsletter  is now online on the SEALG homepage.

It contains a variety of articles – most of them had been presented at our Annual Meeting last year in Lisbon, which we used to convene a panel on “Digging up hidden (re)-sources: The changing roles of libraries and archives in Southeast Asian Studies” at the 7th EUROSEAS Conference in Lisbon. You will find the details about this panel in the report about our Annual Meeting on page 2 of the Newsletter. You will also find information about our upcoming Annual Meeting 2014 which will take place in June 2014 in Frankfurt/Main, Germany. As usual, the meeting is open not only to librarians and area specialists but also archivists, students and members of the research commmunity

Contents of the SEALG Newsletter 2013:
● SEALG Annual Meeting 2013 Report (Jana Igunma)
● Identifying and collecting primary sources of information in the archives and libraries in England, New Zealand, United States and Singapore to reconstruct the details of daily lives and activities of the civilian internees at the Changi Prison and Sime Road Camp during the Japanese occupation of Singapore, 1942-1945 – issues and challenges (Peng Han Lim)
● Accessing Malay manuscripts worldwide through ICT (Wan Ali Wan Mamat)
● Commoners in traditional Vietnamese society – accounts from late 19th and early 20th century records (Sud Chonchirdsin)
The importance of primary source materials with special reference to the Buddhist manuscripts of Thailand (Yohei Shimizu)
Roles of the Thai Library association in the development of Thai libraries, librarianship and library cooperation (Prachark Wattananusit)
British Library’s Malay Manuscripts Digitisation Project (Annabel Teh Gallop)
Announcement SEALG Annual Meeting 2014

Former issues of the Newsletter are also available online via our homepage (click on “Newsletter”).

CDNLAO Newsletter

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The Conference of Directors of National Libraries in Asia and Oceania has published its latest CDNLAO Newsletter, No. 78, November 2013.

A list of contents of the online newsletter, which include articles on rare book collections at the National Library of Myanmar, manuscript collections at the National Library of Thailand, and an exhibition on family histories and collections at the National Library of Singapore is available from the CDNLAO homepage.

The Conference of Directors of National Libraries in Asia and Oceania (CDNLAO) meets every year to discuss library issues of common interest and to promote resource and information sharing within the Asia Pacific region. The first meeting was held in 1979 and the Directors of National Libraries agreed at this meeting that the main aims of CDNLAO would be to exchange information and promote cooperation for the development of libraries in Asia and Oceania, to assist libraries in less developed countries through cooperation, and to understand the state of the art of library development among libraries in Asia and Oceania.

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