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New issue of SEALG Newsletter online

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The latest issue of the SEALG Newsletter (No. 46, 2014) has been published recently and is available online at http://www.sealg.org/Newsletter2014.pdf or via the SEALG homepage (under ‘Newsletter’).

Included in the newsletter is the report of our group’s annual meeting that took place in June 2014 in Frankfurt, Germany, as well as articles and project reports, some written by SEALG members and others authored by members of the research community. We are very glad to be able to establish and to further enhance the links between librarians and researchers with this new issue of our newsletter.

The contents of the newsletter in detail:

Report of the SEALG Annual Meeting 2014 in Frankfurt

A study of nineteenth century Malay school books in the Malay Peninsula (by Lim Peng Han, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur)

The Museum and Ethnic Struggles (by Gumring Hkangda, Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton & Hove)

Burmese royal barges and boats (by San San May, British Library, London)

The beautiful art of Tai palm leaf manuscripts (by Jana Igunma, British Library, London)

Indonesian manuscripts in the Vatican Library (by Anthony Reid, Australian National University, Canberra)

A preservation project for Cham manuscripts in Vietnam (by Hao Phan, Northern Illinois University Libraries, DeKalb)

Announcement: 2015 Annual Meeting of SEALG and SAALG in Paris

To receive regular information about the publication of new issues of the the SEALG Newsletter, and of news from our group in general, you may either become a member of SEALG via the SEALG homepage or you may subscribe to this blog. Please feel free to forward this information to anyone who may be interested in our work.

Jana Igunma (SEALG committee member)

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Pilgrims, healers, and wizards: Buddhism and religious practices in Burma and Thailand

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British Museum blog

Alexandra Green, curator, British Museum

One of my first jobs at the British Museum was to examine the Southeast Asian collections. I found that the holdings from Burma (formally known as Myanmar) and Thailand contain numerous popular posters, mostly on religious themes, that have never been on display, as well as good examples of lacquer, textiles, votive tablets and Buddha images. Other religious objects in the collection include protective diagrams on cloth, tattooing equipment and manuals, and boxes that display images of the zodiac and the eight days of the week (Wednesday is divided into two), both of which are important in divination and producing horoscopes. The material seemed to cry out for an examination of religion in the two countries.

In the 19th and early 20th centuries, Western scholars considered Buddhism to be an austere, monolithic religion focused upon meditation and nirvana (the escape from the cycles of rebirth)…

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Junior Professorship in Southeast Asian Studies at Goethe University Frankfurt

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The Faculty of Linguistics, Cultures and Arts, Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany, invites applications for the following position:

Junior Professorship (Assistant Professor, W1) in Southeast Asian Studies

The university is looking for a candidate with expertise in one or more of the following fields: the languages, literatures, media, or modern and contemporary history of insular Southeast Asia (mainly Indonesia and /or Malaysia).
Expected is an outstanding doctoral thesis, methodologically sound expertise on modern insular Southeast Asia evidenced by relevant publications and teaching experience, very high proficiency in Indonesian / Malay, English, and ideally German as well as the willingness to engage in cooperative research and teaching activities within the Interdisciplinary Center of East Asian Studies (IZO) at Goethe University.

The initial appointment is for three years and can be renewed for another three years upon positive evaluation. The designated salary for the position is based on “W1” of the German university scale. Goethe University is an equal opportunity employer which implies that applications from women are specifically encouraged. For further information regarding the general conditions for professorship appointments, please see: http://www.vakante-professuren.uni-frankfurt.de .

Qualified academics are invited to submit their applications including a CV, a list of publications, and a copy of the doctoral diploma up to 10th Oct. 2014 to the Dean of the Faculty of Faculty of Linguistics, Cultures and Arts, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, D-60054 Frankfurt, E-Mail: Dekanat-FB09@em.uni-frankfurt.de .

 

37th Douarnenez Film Festival

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“Peoples of the Indonesian Archipelago, Timor Leste and Papua”

22-30 August 2014, Douarnenez (France)

This year’s Douarnenez Film Festival – which is a major cinematographic event combining creativity and collective reflection, art and criticism to explore the complexity of the world – will be dedicated to the peoples of the Indonesian Archipelago, Timor Leste and Papua.

The notion of human heritage, including language, culture, and the manifold forms of expression of peoples and communities, underlay the festival from its very beginnings. The aim is to give people a voice and the opportunity to tell their own story through film, literature, photography and music, whether these people are – in their “normal environment” -marginalised or excluded, torn apart or deported, besieged or reduced to silence, dumped or displaced, colonised, dominated against their will or in rebellion.

Through 60 – 70 films, features, documentaries, animation, short and long, the Douarnenez Film Festival will be a platform for these peoples and their cultures. Among the guests will be filmmakers, writers, journalists, human rights activists, historians and many more from Indonesia, Timor Leste, Western Papaua and Europe.

For more detailed information, please visit the Douarnenez Film Festival homepage.

 

Rare Malay newspaper in the Wellcome Library

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The Wellcome Library in London is one of the world’s major resources for the study of medical history. They offer a growing collection of material relating to contemporary medicine and biomedical science in society.

The Wellcome Library is currently developing a world-class online resource for the history of medicine by digitising a substantial proportion of its holdings and making the content freely available on the web.

The Library’s digitisation programme includes:

  • cover-to-cover books
  • video and audio
  • entire archive collections and manuscripts
  • paintings, prints, drawings, photographs, ephemera and more.

The Library was founded on the collections of Sir Henry Wellcome (1853-1936) and is best known for its medical materials. However, the Library also holds important Asian collections especially pertaining to medicine, religious practices, divination and magic, including Malay, Batak and Javanese manuscripts (described in Ricklefs & Voorhoeve 1982).

Wellcome Images, another digitisation initiative of the Wellcome Library, makes available a wealth of images, including images from Malay manuscripts on magic, photographs of Sarawak and Penang, watercolour drawings of Singapore and Johor, and a very rare a copy of an early Malay newspaper published in Singapore in 1877, of which no other copies are known to survive anywhere else in the world: Peridaran al-Shams wa-al-Qamar, ‘The revolution of the sun and the moon’.  

Annabel Teh Gallop had a closer look at this rare item and published an article on the Rare Malay newspaper at the Wellcome Library on the Asian & African Studies Blog of the British Library, explaining the historical context of this newspaper and providing the details of publications for further reading on that topic.